Taiwan

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Our story starts at the University of Alberta in the 1960s when most Taiwanese people came to Edmonton as postgraduate students. This was because the Taiwanese Government only permitted graduates receiving a foreign scholarship to study abroad. At that time, Professor Chen Dongbi, from the Law Department of U of A, provided extensive care for those Taiwanese students. He was later appointed as the Representative of Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Canada in 2000. 

The Edmonton Taiwanese Association (ETA) was officially established in 1976 by following the lead from Mr. Dongbi and forming a small Taiwanese group with elected directors to provide services to its members. The ETA is a non-political, non-religious, and non-profit organization with a mission to assist Taiwanese immigrants integrate into mainstream Canadian society and to provide the social support and community resources needed to make Edmonton their home.  

Our organization was granted permission to participate in the Heritage Festival as the Taiwanese Pavilion in 1980. This was only after two directors, on behalf of the Edmonton Taiwanese Association, were invited to attend a debate with representatives from the China and Hong Kong Pavilions and were successful in pleading our case.

For the last 40 years ETA has strived to deliver an outstanding and memorable experience sharing our country with Edmontonian visiting the Taiwan Pavilion. Our team of volunteers always work tirelessly and diligently to source local Taiwanese food and souvenirs to sell, to attend dance rehearsals and sew performance outfits for the stage shows, and to ensure we have fun interactive crafts and games for all to enjoy. 

We also collaborate with the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Vancouver, BC to bring traditional and cultural performances from professional dance groups and artists to our Pavilion’s stage. No matter which pieces of Taiwan and Taiwanese culture we end up sharing with you, each year our volunteers are rewarded with a tremendous feeling of accomplishment and pride. 

台灣館的由來起源於1960年在愛德蒙頓(愛城)艾爾伯塔大學就讀研究所的台灣留學生。由於當時台灣政府只開放領取國外獎學金的畢業生出國留學,因此艾爾伯塔大學法律系的陳東碧教授為這群海外的學子們提供了廣泛的照顧。 2000年後,陳東碧教授被任命為台北經濟文化辦公室駐加拿大代表。

在陳東碧教授的領導下,愛德蒙頓台灣同鄉會正式成立於1976年。它是由選舉產生的董事會而組成的台灣社團。愛德蒙頓台灣同鄉會是一個屬於非政治,非宗教和非營利組織的團體,主要任務是為其會員們提供台灣移民及協助台灣留學生融入加拿大主流社會的服務,並提供適應愛德蒙頓成為海外家園所需的支持和社區資源。

 

愛城台灣同鄉會於1980年向民俗文化節協會申請以台灣館參加年度的民俗文化節。兩位理事代表愛城台灣同鄉會應邀出席了與中國館和香港館的角逐辯論。終於皇天不負有心人,台灣館從1980年起,獲准參加每年度的愛城民俗文化節,為台灣爭光。

 

40年來,歷屆的理事團隊和志工們為了每年在台灣館的推廣中表現出色並取得圓滿成功,大家眾志城城不遺餘力進行了一連串的活動項目彩排,包括舞蹈排練和縫紉表演服裝、準備美食及烹飪佳餚、手工藝品和民間傳統童玩,以及各式各樣的藝術表演活動等。年復一年如此精心設計的內容終於獲得了愛城人們無庸置疑的肯定,也為每年台灣館的演出畫下完美的句點。


愛城台灣同鄉會常年都與台北經濟文化局合作,邀請台灣專業舞蹈團體和藝術家在愛德蒙頓參加傳統文化表演,慶祝加拿大艾爾伯塔省的節日及傳統活動。無論表演內容及活動為何,我們的志工團隊們總是燃心為香,全力以赴,為台灣館盡心盡力而感到無比驕傲與自豪。

Learn about Taiwan

Taiwan landmark and attraction

Taiwan Folk Custom

Taiwan street foods

Taiwan Custom

Tea Culture

Tea is an important part of Taiwan’s culture.  Tea has had an important effect on Taiwanese people’s lives for hundreds of years and continues to be important today.

Tea is one of the traditional drinks in Taiwan and has been developed there for over 200 years.  Tea first started being harvested in the central and southern areas of Taiwan.  If you wanted to impress an important person, you would give them the gift of tea!  Additionally, hosts made tea to treat their friends or customers at banquets or at their home.  You can experience traditional Taiwanese tea houses in Jiufen and Maokong in Northern Taiwan. While there, professional servers can teach you the history and customs of Taiwan’s famous teas.

Nowadays, tea continues to bring joy into Taiwanese people’s lives.  Taiwanese tea is exported all over the world for everyone to enjoy.  In the past, tea was mostly enjoyed by older people but today, young people also enjoy tea though in a slightly different form – bubble tea!  We hope this Heritage Days experience will give you a small taste of Taiwan’s tea culture.

A-LI SHAN tea festival in four seasons

Performances

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Lanterns

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Taiwan Peony Floral Lantern:

when Lanterns meets Taiwan Peony Floral Chintz

Lanterns in Taiwan, like in other Asian Countries, were used primarily as a light source before electricity and light bulbs were invented. Lantern’s paper shade kept the candle from going out in the wind. In the present day, lanterns are used only for decorations and celebrations.

Taiwan Floral Chintz is a hybrid and unique floral printed fabric. Its design was influenced by Chinese and Japanese elements. With the focus on peony, Taiwan has developed its very own floral traditional pattern.

While peony grows naturally in China and Japan, Taiwan’s climate is not ideal for a peony to survive.  Even so, as much as the Chinese and the Japanese love this flower, the Taiwanese also love peony as well as its symbolic meaning of ‘happiness’, ‘wealth’ and ‘vitality’.

Taiwan Floral Chintz's distinctiveness lies in its creation of the ‘Peony Four Seasons’ pattern. In the Peony Four Seasons, peony is not pictured independently but is always accompanied with a variety of flowers from the four seasons. Below is a list of flowers commonly used in Taiwanese Floral Chintz designs.

Spring:      Peony, Cherry blossoms, orchid, Sycamore flower

Summer: Vine flower, Ball flower, Hemerocallis, Lily, Bellflower, Calamus,

Medium flower, Lotus

Fall:           Chrysanthemum (mums), Maple, Reed, Autumn grass

Winter:    Plum blossom, Bamboo, Pine, Daffodils, Camellia

Taiwan Floral Cloth Lanterns are widely used for decorations and festival celebrations nowadays in Taiwan. And you may have guessed it, lanterns made with Taiwan Peony Floral Chintz

Visit Web Shop

Why lanterns are important to Taiwan

Taiwan Lantern Festival

Cuisine

Learn to make:

the organization

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The Edmonton Taiwanese Association (ETA) was officially

established in 1976 by following the lead from Mr. Dongbi and forming a small Taiwanese group with elected directors to provide services to its members. The ETA is a non-political, non-religious, and non-profit organization with a mission to assist Taiwanese immigrants in integrating into the mainstream Canadian society and providing the social support and community resources needed to make Edmonton their home.  

Our organization was granted permission to participate in the Heritage Festival as the Taiwanese Pavilion in 1980. This was only after two directors, on behalf of the Edmonton Taiwanese Association, were invited to attend a debate with representatives from the China and Hong Kong Pavilions and were successful in pleading our case.

For the last 40 years ETA has strived to deliver an outstanding and memorable experience sharing our country with Edmontonians visiting the Taiwan Pavilion. Our team of volunteers always work tirelessly and diligently to source local Taiwanese food and souvenirs to sell, to attend dance rehearsals and sew performance outfits for the stage shows, and to ensure we have fun interactive crafts and games for all to enjoy.

We also collaborate with the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Vancouver, BC to bring traditional and cultural performances from professional dance groups and artists to our Pavilion’s stage.

 

No matter which pieces of Taiwan and Taiwanese culture we end up sharing with you, each year our volunteers are rewarded with a tremendous feeling of accomplishment and pride.